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Energy Programs

                                       Built Green         

Canada is a leader in many aspects in the world. It is often cited as being one of the livable and desirable places to live on Earth. However, we’re also the leaders in a few other categories that aren’t so flattering. Canada is the largest consumer of energy in the world on a per capita basis and is the second-largest producer of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

  • By having an energy-efficient home you will not only save money but also reduce greenhouse gas emissions that may contribute to climate change.
  • The average Canadian family spends up to 90 per cent of their time indoors so air quality is ever more relevant than in other parts of the world. Poor air quality in homes and buildings are cited as likely contributors to asthma, which now affects about 13 per cent of Canadian children.
  • Seventeen per cent of GHG emissions in Canada are produced by residential energy use so by cutting down your own home’s emissions is helping the nation as a whole.

Whether you go with an ENERGY STAR® or R-2000* certified home – or both – it is always beneficial to get an EnerGuide* rating that will tell you how much energy your home may consume.

With the cost of electricity expected to increase along with an increased demand over the next 20 years by 45 per cent, cutting your energy consumption will help offset other increases in your daily life caused by regular inflation.

Homes are inspected by third-parties and are continuously being trained in the latest skills and technology of the day to make sure your home’s assessment is up to date.

And it’s not just new homes that are available for these programs. When renovating homes you can get an assessment before and after and often be able to receive money back in grants and subsidies for improvements made to your home.

So, which program is right for you?

 

*EnerGuide and R-2000 are official marks of Natural Resources Canada and used with permission. The ENERGY STAR mark is administered and promoted in Canada and is used with permission